Top Ten Blog Posts 2017

Originally posted on e-Learning Stuff.

clipboard

This year I have written 21 blog posts, in 2016 it was 43 blog posts, in 2015 I wrote 24 blog posts. In 2014 I wrote 11 and in 2013 I wrote 64 blog posts and over a hundred in 2012. In 2011 I thought 150 was a quiet year!

The tenth most popular blog post in 2017 was written for the 2015 ALT Winter Conference, my blog post on time and priorities, I don’t have a dog #altc This was a discussion piece and looks at the over used excuse for not doing something, which is not having the time to do it. The real reason though, more often then not, is that the person concerned does not see it as a priority.

In ninth place is a post from 2016, which was Mapping the learning and teaching. Mapping is an useful exercise to think about practice and though any such map may not be accurate or complete, it does allow you to consider and think about actions and training required to change behaviours or how spaces and tools are used. I took the concepts used in mapping visitor and residents behaviour and looked at how it could be used for teaching and learning. This post has been used for workshops in some universities and colleges.

Dropping down to number eight was Comic Life – iPad App of the Week Though I have been using Comic Life on the Mac for a few years now I realised I hadn’t written much about the iPad app that I had bought back when the iPad was released. It’s a great app for creating comics and works really well with the touch interface and iPad camera.

Back in June I wrote up the presentation I was going to deliver in Manchester for the CILIP Conference in July, and this post, The Intelligent Library #CILIPConf17 was in at number seven. What is the future of the library? This session at the CILIP Conference will explore the potential technologies and the possibilities that can arise from the developments in artificial intelligence and the internet of things. Can we build an intelligent library? Do we want to?

Back in 2015 I asked I can do that… What does “embrace technology” mean? in relation to the Area Review process and this post was the sixth most popular post in 2017.

Clmbing back two places to fifth was 100 ways to use a VLE – #89 Embedding a Comic Strip. This was a post from July 2011, that looked at the different comic tools out there on the web, which can be used to create comic strips that can then be embedded into the VLE. It included information on the many free online services such as Strip Creator and Toonlet out there. It is quite a long post and goes into some detail about the tools you can use and how comics can be used within the VLE.

Dropping two places to fourth, is Can I legally download a movie trailer? One of the many copyright articles that I posted some years back, this one was in 2008, I am still a little behind in much of what is happening within copyright and education, one of things I do need to update myself on, as things have changed.

In third place is a post from 2017, Show me the evidence… This post was inspired by a discussion on the ALT Members mailing list, in which one line asked:

…in particular to share these with academics when they ask for the evidence to show technology can make a difference.

In the post I questioned the motivations about staff when asking the question and if this was the actual problem why staff weren’t engaging with learning technologies. I am sure it is for some, but from my personal experience, often it isn’t!

Climbing back two places back to second, from 2013, was Frame Magic – iPhone App of the Week, still don’t know why this one is so popular!

Once again, for the fifth year running, the number one post for 2016 was the The iPad Pedagogy Wheel. I re-posted the iPad Pedagogy Wheel as I was getting asked a fair bit, “how can I use this nice shiny iPad that you have given me to support teaching and learning?”.
It’s a really simple nice graphic that explores the different apps available and where they fit within Bloom’s Taxonomy. What I like about it is that you can start where you like, if you have an iPad app you like you can see how it fits into the pedagogy. Or you can work out which iPads apps fit into a pedagogical problem.

So there we have it, the top ten posts of2017, of which just two were from 2017!

Top Ten Blog Posts 2017

Originally posted on e-Learning Stuff.

clipboard

This year I have written 21 blog posts, in 2016 it was 43 blog posts, in 2015 I wrote 24 blog posts. In 2014 I wrote 11 and in 2013 I wrote 64 blog posts and over a hundred in 2012. In 2011 I thought 150 was a quiet year!

The tenth most popular blog post in 2017 was written for the 2015 ALT Winter Conference, my blog post on time and priorities, I don’t have a dog #altc This was a discussion piece and looks at the over used excuse for not doing something, which is not having the time to do it. The real reason though, more often then not, is that the person concerned does not see it as a priority.

In ninth place is a post from 2016, which was Mapping the learning and teaching. Mapping is an useful exercise to think about practice and though any such map may not be accurate or complete, it does allow you to consider and think about actions and training required to change behaviours or how spaces and tools are used. I took the concepts used in mapping visitor and residents behaviour and looked at how it could be used for teaching and learning. This post has been used for workshops in some universities and colleges.

Dropping down to number eight was Comic Life – iPad App of the Week Though I have been using Comic Life on the Mac for a few years now I realised I hadn’t written much about the iPad app that I had bought back when the iPad was released. It’s a great app for creating comics and works really well with the touch interface and iPad camera.

Back in June I wrote up the presentation I was going to deliver in Manchester for the CILIP Conference in July, and this post, The Intelligent Library #CILIPConf17 was in at number seven. What is the future of the library? This session at the CILIP Conference will explore the potential technologies and the possibilities that can arise from the developments in artificial intelligence and the internet of things. Can we build an intelligent library? Do we want to?

Back in 2015 I asked I can do that… What does “embrace technology” mean? in relation to the Area Review process and this post was the sixth most popular post in 2017.

Clmbing back two places to fifth was 100 ways to use a VLE – #89 Embedding a Comic Strip. This was a post from July 2011, that looked at the different comic tools out there on the web, which can be used to create comic strips that can then be embedded into the VLE. It included information on the many free online services such as Strip Creator and Toonlet out there. It is quite a long post and goes into some detail about the tools you can use and how comics can be used within the VLE.

Dropping two places to fourth, is Can I legally download a movie trailer? One of the many copyright articles that I posted some years back, this one was in 2008, I am still a little behind in much of what is happening within copyright and education, one of things I do need to update myself on, as things have changed.

In third place is a post from 2017, Show me the evidence… This post was inspired by a discussion on the ALT Members mailing list, in which one line asked:

…in particular to share these with academics when they ask for the evidence to show technology can make a difference.

In the post I questioned the motivations about staff when asking the question and if this was the actual problem why staff weren’t engaging with learning technologies. I am sure it is for some, but from my personal experience, often it isn’t!

Climbing back two places back to second, from 2013, was Frame Magic – iPhone App of the Week, still don’t know why this one is so popular!

Once again, for the fifth year running, the number one post for 2016 was the The iPad Pedagogy Wheel. I re-posted the iPad Pedagogy Wheel as I was getting asked a fair bit, “how can I use this nice shiny iPad that you have given me to support teaching and learning?”.
It’s a really simple nice graphic that explores the different apps available and where they fit within Bloom’s Taxonomy. What I like about it is that you can start where you like, if you have an iPad app you like you can see how it fits into the pedagogy. Or you can work out which iPads apps fit into a pedagogical problem.

So there we have it, the top ten posts of2017, of which just two were from 2017!

Seasons greetings and end-of-year update from the Tracker team

Originally posted on Jisc Digital Student.

Santa tracker

Wishing all our Tracker contacts and institutions a Merry Christmas and a very Happy, student-centred and data-rich New Year!

Thank you for all your interest and support in 2017. We look forward to even stronger data and findings from the Tracker in 2018, and working with you to understand and support the student digital experience.

In the last few weeks we have run a number of webinars for late sign-ups to the tracker project, many of them from outside the UK. If you missed these and would like a chance to review them, this recording from December 14th covers the background, basic information for getting started in BOS, and some information about the staff tracker (see further on in this post for more).

In case you miss our regular updates over the Christmas break, there’s some background reading to catch up on. A recent blog post on engaging students in the tracker has ideas for every phase of the project, especially for promoting and completing the survey. There’s also now a quick guide to customising and launching the tracker, if you feel confident enough with BOS not to need the step-by-step guide – though this is also available from the same post.

We have two important updates to announce as 2017 draws to a close.

We’ve been asked a number of times for support with promoting the Tracker, and we’re delighted to offer a number of posters and flyers you can repurpose with your own organisational branding. These will be available from the start of January to download and use. We’ll continue to share great designs and promotional ideas from across the project, so there is no need to curb your own creativity.

And as promised, we’ve produced a first draft of questions for teaching staff. The rationale for developing these will be available on this blog in early January, along with a draft set of questions for comment, and details of how you can get involved in piloting them. We spoke about this initiative at the ALT online conference in December, so if you can’t wait until the new year, more details and a link to the draft questions are available now from the ALT online conference session.

We hope you have a very restful Christmas and look forward to working with you again in the new year.

The Tracker Team

 

 

Embedding the Culture of Engagement

Originally posted on Change Agents' Network.

Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change

Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change

We are delighted to announce the publication of the 5th edition of the Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change: Vol 3, No 2 (2017): Embedding the Culture of Engagement. This edition brings together practice which was presented at the CAN 2016 conference held at the University of Lincoln and showcases the innovative practice in student-staff partnerships.

Joint editors of this edition, Simon Walker, Reece Horsley, John-Paul Dickie, Marcus Elliot, Duncan McKenna, Emily Parkin, Sarah Knight share their reflections, in the editors’ introduction, on the practice which is shared through case studies, research articles, opinion pieces, technology reviews and videos in the journal.

The Journal to date has published 100 articles, which have had 30,000 views and 11,000 article downloads since 2015, showing the importance of sharing current practice in the area of student staff partnerships. The Journal was established to encourage and support students to publish their work in this area and we are delighted to see students as authors and co-authors in this edition.

Being a Trustee…

Originally posted on lawrie : converged.

I’ve been a trustee and company director of several animal and educational charities over the last 25 years.   You get involved as a trustee at first because you are passionate about the “cause” or perhaps invited because you have a skill set, or you are elected (as happened in two educational charities I was a trustee of).

It’s a lot of fun, you get to be part of a group of people deciding the big picture stuff, coming up with campaigns or pushing particular agendas. Even when you are arguing with your fellow trustees you, mostly, know that you all have the same broad objectives in mind.

This morning’s news about NMC brought what being a trustee is responsible for into sharp focus:

“The New Media Consortium (NMC) regrets to announce that because of apparent errors and omissions by its former Controller and Chief Financial Officer, the organization finds itself insolvent,” the group said in an email message sent to its members on Monday afternoon. “Consequently, NMC must cease operations immediately.”

NMC is a Non-Profit organisation in the US, similar to UK charity. It will have a board of trustees or directors in the same way as charities in England and Wales, and be governed by similar laws.

The UK Government actually lay out the responsibilities of a board of trustees – something I didn’t engage with until the first charity I was involved with started having “problems”. Whilst I can’t disclose what the problems were, they weren’t illegal or immoral – but there were procedural issues that gave me pause to think.

In short the key responsibilities of a trustee are;

  • Doing what its supposed to
    Making sure that the charity is carrying out the purposes for which it was set up (and you should be able to explain how all of the charity’s activities are intended to further or support its purposes). This also includes making sure that funds aren’t spent on the wrong purposes, some trustees may have to reimburse the charity personally if this occurs.
  • Binding and Legal
    Trustees need to ensure that the charity is compliant with its own with its governing documents; and that it is also compliant with all laws that apply to the charity (such as data protection, child protection etc).
  • Manage your charity’s resources responsibly
    This is one of my favourite sections of the Government’s advice. It means that trustees must ensure the charity’s assets are only used to support or carry out its purposes, that you budget correctly and not over-commit and that you don’t expose the charity’s assets to undue risk. The bit I like is that as a trustee you are also responsible for not exposing beneficiaries of the charity, or the reputation of the charity to undue risk.
  • Accountability
    Finally, as a trustee, you are responsible for the accountability of the charity. There are three key elements that, as trustee you need to be focused on;

    • Firstly , and above all, the charity is operating legally, and you are also responsible for it being “well run and effective”;
    • Secondly, where appropriate, be accountable to members;
    • Finally, where things are delegated to staff or volunteers, there remains accountability.

Ignorantia juris non excusat

I have no idea what will happen regarding NMC, I didn’t particularly like all of their reports (we all remember the ‘digital Adobe literacy’ one, and Sheila’s post about it!) , but I think some were excellent, and those people I know who have been involved are by and large good people doing good things for the right reasons.

This morning’s news is obviously sad for all involved. But for me it is a reminder that being a trustee for any organisation comes with responsibility, and in some cases personal liability. I know a lot of people, and have served alongside some, who want to be a trustee because it builds their CV, or moves them in the right circles, or sometimes because it is a status thing.

The demise of NMC should be a reminder that being a trustee means taking on duties and responsibilities. As Martin Weller pointed out:

“As a trustee you can’t be an expert in all areas, such as accountancy, but you should be expecting to ask difficult questions.”

I wish all involved at NMC the very best at a difficult time.  

Reflections from the Jisc Online Workshop on Digital Identity and Wellbeing

Originally posted on Inspiring learning.

Last week, Esther Barrett, Rebecca Burningham and I delivered the first in a series of exciting new online workshops focusing on key areas of digital capability. Whilst the workshop is still fresh in my mind I want to share some of my reflections from the session (before breaking up for Christmas and taking on fresh challenges – another mince pie anyone?).

Woman sitting in Lotus position

Woman sitting in Lotus position

The first session focused on how we support learners around areas of digital identity and wellbeing – a topic close to my heart and relevant to all of our member organisations. Not only because we have a duty of care towards all of our learners, but also because it’s often difficult to unravel our digital identities from the people they represent.

The first point that struck me about the session was the range of participants that had signed up for the workshop. We had librarians (from HE and FE); senior lecturers and learning technologists in attendance (we even had one dedicated person attending from Australia – a great advert for how synchronous online learning can span geographical barriers that face-to-face learning can’t overcome). For me, this reflected how digital capability cuts across a range of roles within an organisation and is everyone’s concern – not just those with direct responsibility for it.

Before the session we had set up some background reading on our learning platform for participants to familiarise themselves with the subject and get up to speed with many of the resources Jisc has to offer, including:-

  • The Jisc Digital Capability framework, which comprises the six key elements of digital capability. The framework provides a high-level, general account of the digital capabilities that we aim to develop – in our staff and in our learners.
  • The results of the Student Digital Experience Tracker published this summer, which paints a national picture of the student digital experience. Within the Tracker there are key questions relating to how students feel supported when developing their own digital identities and aspects of digital safety and wellbeing.
  • The Jisc Learner profile which provides a starting point for defining the digital capabilities required by learners and can be used to inform how you support learners. We used this extensively throughout the session to look at specific areas that learners may need further support.
  • The Jisc/NUS benchmarking tool to look at what steps organisations could take to support learners around digital wellbeing.

This is by no means an exhaustive list and I think it’s fair to say we had a variety of activities during the session to encourage sharing, collaboration and reflection. These activities consisted of built-in features of Adobe Connect (such as polls, chat, breakout rooms, open mics, etc) as well as some personal favourites that took you outside of Adobe Connect (Mentimeter, Padlet, LinoIt, etc). The point we wanted to make was that good online learning (regardless of the tools) is about so much more than uploading PowerPoints to a VLE – it’s about engaging with your learners in a meaningful way, by asking them where they are, what they think and involving them wherever possible.

If you’d like to know more about the series of online workshops Jisc has to offer we are developing an online community of practice under the #jisconlineworkshop hashtag and the next workshop is due to run in February 2018 (focussing on developing learner employability skills).

The post Reflections from the Jisc Online Workshop on Digital Identity and Wellbeing appeared first on Inspiring learning.

Getting started with digital – some thinking aloud

Originally posted on lawrie : converged.

An academic recently approached me and said:

“I have been doing things this way for a long time – I want to do some digital stuff, I am on Twitter, I use Facebook I have good skills in Office and Google, but how do get started with changing my teaching?”

It got me thinking. We have lots of material and case studies, we have exemplar teachers and researchers using digital in their practice. But this lecturer just wanted a way (not a place) to start and think.

James Clay has been using a phrase on the Jisc Digital Leaders course when he talks about institutional strategies – “look at it though a digital lens”. So I wanted to think about what that digital lens might look like.

This is very much a first draft – some end of the week, end of the year, thinking – I am looking for feedback.

At the centre of the diagram are three elements that you may want to consider looking at through a digital lens:

  • Strategy, James’ initial idea of instead of having a separate digital strategy looking at existing strategies through a digital lens;
  • Practice, whether teaching, research or administration these activities are made up of our existing practices – what would happen if we looked at and reflected on them in the context of digital;
  • Process, many things happen “because that is the way they have always happened” digital is constantly changing, and we should reflect and think what that means to many of the processes that are embedded in our work.

Around the edge of those three elements is the proposed lens through which to engage with digital:

  • Identify
    Identify individual elements of either practice, strategy or existing tools and systems.
  • Explore
    Look at options for adding a digital element, either content, tools, moving to platforms (VLE, Yammer), or engaging with people in digital networks (e.g Twitter).
  • Benefits and risks
    Identify what benefits might be realised by adding digital elements and assess any risks
  • Deploy
    After weighing different options, benefits and risks, come to a decision on whether to deploy the digital element
  • Reflect and evaluate
    Build a schedule for reflecting on and evaluating the digital element, how can it be changed and built on, should it be continued?

For me the key is in breaking down each of the practice, processes or strategies I suggest a simple diagram to help.

Breakdown the individual elements into simple chunks if for example it is how you teach, start with the things that you are most comfortable with – for some that might be giving a lecture or a tutorial, but for others it might be fieldwork or lab work. Try and look at as granular as you can to populate the diagram.

Once you have populated the diagram use the digital lens approach to:

  • Identify the practice, process or strategy
  • Explore the digital options
  • Assess benefits and risks
  • Decide on if and how to deploy
  • Reflect on, and evaluate the digital option.

 

 

You may want to have a set of “digital cues” on hand to help – or even list digital tools?

 

 

 

Example Digital Cues

  • Communication tools
  • Collaboration tools
  • Participation in networks
  • Online learning
  • Virtual teaching tools
  • Tools to develop your digital identity
  • Management of health and digital well being
  • Finding, evaluating, managing, curating, and sharing digital information
  • Collating, managing, accessing and using digital data
  • Critically evaluation of media in a range of formats
  • Design and create digital artefacts

 

 

This is very much “thinking out loud” – so at this stage some critical feedback would be welcome – also a little help in populating the diagrams would be nice 🙂

 

CAN 2018: Championing student-staff partnership in an age of change: Call for Contributions

Originally posted on Change Agents' Network.

Partnership1.jpgWe are delighted to announce the call for contributions for CAN 2018 hosted by the University of Winchester and supported by Jisc. This year the CAN conference will be focusing on student-staff partnerships at universities and colleges in the age of change. With significant developments happening across the UK educational landscape, the conference themes ask us to be both reflective and dynamic in our practice, in order to facilitate effective partnerships and improve the student educational experience.

We particularly welcome contributions for the themes below. A brief description of these themes and the types of submissions can be found on this blog page.

  1. Theme One: Keeping Student Engagement and Partnership Relevant in an Age of Change
  2. Theme Two: Researching, Evaluating and Evidencing effective Engagement and Partnership
  3. Theme Three: Developing Digital Capabilities in an Ever Changing Landscape
  4. Theme Four: Ensuring the Student Voice is heard and the Feedback Loop is closed
  5. Theme Five: Student-Staff Partnerships to support Innovation and Inclusivity in the Curriculum
  6. Theme Six: (posters only) Entrepreneurship and Innovation Showcase

Please submit your proposal to CAN@winchester.ac.uk by the 12th January 2018. Forms can be found here.

Please note:

  • We will give priority to contributions which are student-led or collaboratively delivered by staff and students
  • We will confirm which proposals have been accepted by Monday 9th February 2018

Registration for the conference will open in January. Please visit https://can.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2018-can-conference-winchester/ to keep updated on conference developments.

If you have any questions please contact: CAN@winchester.ac.uk

Get Involved

To follow developments about CAN2018 and the Change Agents’ Network follow @CANagogy and the Twitter hashtag #CAN2018 for this event. You can join the Change Agents’ Network mailing list:http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/CAN

Notes and presentations from the 12th Learning Analytics Network meeting at the University of Greenwich

Originally posted on Effective Learning Analytics.

Old Naval CollegeThe University of Greenwich provided a great setting for our most recent UK Learning Analytics Network meeting on 23rd Nov 2017. It is recorded in 3 sections:

Part 1: David Maguire (the latter part of his address), Phil Richards, Rob Wyn Jones, Mark Harrington (40 mins 32 secs)

Part 2: Suzanne Owen, Michael Web, Panel Session (2hrs 5 mins 30 secs)

Part 3: Christine Cooper & Karl Molden (29 mins 10 secs)

Unfortunately Andrew Cormack’s presentation was not recorded. However much of his thinking on GDPR is captured in his blog posts on the subject.

Prof David Maguire

Prof David Maguire

We started off with a welcome address by Prof David Maguire, Vice Chancellor of the University, who has a strong interest in learning analytics and is Chair of Jisc.

We then had a series of updates from Jisc colleagues on the Effective Learning Analytics Project [ppt 704KB]. Dr Phil Richards, Jisc’s Chief Innovation Officer, kicked this session off with the latest news and his vision for the future. He announced a new joint exploration with Turnitin of how to use assessment data held in that system for learning analytics.

Phil also discussed how SolutionPath Stream will now be fully integrated into Jisc’s learning analytics architecture.

Phil Richards from Jisc

Dr Phil Richards

Phil’s vision is of learning analytics transitioning through various stages to become ever more sophisticated, with personalised and adaptive learning becoming increasingly feasible.

Rob Wyn Jones then updated us on Jisc’s plans for its Learning Analytics Service. The Beta Service will be active until 31st July 2018.  The fully-supported service will have a dedicated helpdesk, user groups and product development roadmaps. There are currently 18 Pathfinder Institutions implementing the service and there are 15 further free of charge places available for 2018. From August the service will be charged for. See Rob’s presentation [ppt 704KB] for details of the prices, which have now been agreed.

The Data Explorer and Study Goal products will be continuously enhanced, with Data Explorer including basic case mangement / CRM functionality soon. JLAP, the Jisc Learning Analytics Predictor, which carried out predictive analytics on areas such as which students are at risk, is about to be rolled out with 5 institutions.

Rob Wyn Jones from Jisc

Rob Wyn Jones

Other technical developments include a new Unified Data Definition v1.3.2 and new plugins for Moodle and Blackboard to extract their data to the Learning Data Hub (the new name for the Learning Records Warehouse). Discussions are underway too with Canvas to extract data from that VLE to the Learning Data Hub.

There’s a growing portfolio of vendors involved in the architecture, both supplying data (e.g. Turnitin, Blackboard) and providing analytics services (e.g. SolutionPath, Tribal).

Finally, Mark Harrington told us about the new Jisc Learning Analytics Purchasing Service, an online portal for products, services and infrastructure that are compatible with Jisc’s learning analytics architecture and service.  This is designed to make purchasing easier for institutions, and to add value. Further details are available.

Andrew Cormack, Jisc’s Chief Regulatory Adviser was next up. His hot topic was the forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and how to handle student consent for learning analytics.

Andrew Cormack from Jisc

Andrew Cormack

 

In Andrew’s presentation (ppt 1.03MB) he argues that using consent as the basis for collecting and analysing student data is not always necessary or sensible. The legitimate interest of the organisation may be a better justification: in this case the legitimate interest would be in improving learning.

Doorway at Old Naval CollegeLegitimate interest however cannot be used if the data is ‘sensitive data’, now know in the GDPR as ‘special category data’, such as ethnicity or health data. To use this data, either consent must be sought from the student or there must be a legal obligation to do so.

Intervention with a student (e.g. a tutor phoning them up because they appear to be at risk) would also require the student to provide their free, informed consent in advance.

After lunch Suzanne Owen from Turnitin presented on ‘Unlocking Turnitin Data with Jisc Learning Analytics’ (ppt 2.52MB). She discussed Kerr Gardiner’s recent survey of UK universities, where he found that all of those he questioned saw a requirement to access all student-related data to support the implementation of learning analytics and to inform metrics such as those in the Teaching Enhancement Framework (TEF).

Suzanne Owen from Turnitin

Suzanne Owen

Suzanne discussed how Turnitin works after students submit assignments to it, analysing the assignments’ orginality. She looked at how plagiarism, essay mills and ghost writing are growing problems, and how Turnitin is adding increased functionality to solve this.

Michael Webb from Jisc

Michael Webb

Next up was Jisc’s Director of Analytics and Technology, Michael Webb, explaining how predictive modelling works. He used Jisc’s Learning Analytics Predictor (JLAP) as an example of the various processed involved.

We then had a panel session “Getting your data right for learning analytics” with Adam Cooper (Tribal), Neil Price (University of South Wales), Lee Baylis & Josh Ring (Jisc) and Richard Gascoigne (SolutionPath).

Adam started this with some interesting reflections (pdf 883KB). He suggests that it’s important for someone to take a critical analytical view on the data who has good attention to detail and domain knowledge. You also need someone who knows what the data means in each system and should take an iterative approach to assembling and cleaning your data. Good written data definitions, he says, are essential.

Panel session with Adam Cooper presenting

Adam Cooper

Lee, Josh and Richard all added their perspectives and the audience chipped in with various points and questions. It was great too to have Neil’s perspective from the University of South Wales, as someone who’s been encountering the issues at first hand and has been consistently pro-active in moving things forward. There was a lot of experience and good tips provided by the panel, and the recording is worth watching.

Karl Molden from Greenwich presenting

Our next meeting will be at Edinburgh University on 22nd Feb 2018, the agenda and booking form will be posted to this blog in advance. Sign up to the analytics@jiscmail list if you want to receive details of that meeting and other developments in learning analytics by email.

 

 

 

The Learning Evolution – Books, Augmented Reality, Narrative and Beyond…

Originally posted on Inspiring learning.

In June of 2017, I was invited to speak at the UAReloaded conference in St.Loen-Rot Germany. The conference theme is user assistance (UA) and invited experts from a range of fields to explore and disruptively change the future of UA. The conference had a refreshing approach combining talks, forums, exhibits and UA Camp, an open-ended activity during which participants could engage and collaborate with other experts.

Learning resources that convey threshold concepts

Delivering a workshop about visual learning resources that convey threshold concepts

On the first day of the event, I was fortunate enough to deliver a workshop looking at the application of visual learning resources that convey threshold concepts using bite-sized video and Augmented Reality (AR). Some of the examples in education included using an Airway Managment training dummy in combination with AR to enhance the learning experience for Paramedic Students.

During the second day, I gave a talk entitled The Learning Evolution that looked at how education can leverage the power of technology (in this case AR and Mixed Reality (MR), to the benefit of the student learning experience.

AR Class room management by Computer-Human Interaction in Learning and Instruction (CHILI)

AR Classroom management by Computer-Human Interaction in Learning and Instruction (CHILI)

A great example of how AR can be used in education is the work developed by Computer-Human Interaction in Learning and Instruction (CHILI). They have used AR to manage classroom groups and activities. You can see this in action by watching the video.

I also covered the current availability of applications that allow non-technical practitioners to engage and use AR in education. Many of the conference attendees were unaware of the potential of AR, and its application to education. You can see just some of the applications by watching the video below.

The Learning Evolution Talk

The Learning Evolution

During the event I spoke with many participants who were world leaders in their specific fields, working at large multinational companies such as Google and SAP, to individuals who had become experts in their particular area.

Companies big or small can learn from each other.

Companies big or small can learn from each other.

What struck me the most was how much companies big or small can learn from each other. An example of this was the excellent talk given by Alison Norrington from Story Central. Alison spoke about how stories are timeless and global vehicles that communicate, explore, persuade and inspire. The advantages offered by Alison during her talk could be applied to companies large or small.

At the end of the event, I spoke with several people who had been inspired by some of the topics covered during the event, including some who would now be looking to try AR in their practice.

If you would like to know more about how AR or other technologies can help your organisation, my position as subject specialist can provide impactful practical support and assistance to Jisc members, in addition to providing consultancy services in the form of thought leadership, training, guidance and facilitation as a ‘critical friend’ to external organisations.

References:

Alison Norrington / Story Central
Computer-Human Interaction in Learning and Instruction (CHILI)
UA Reloaded
Zapbox

 

The post The Learning Evolution – Books, Augmented Reality, Narrative and Beyond… appeared first on Inspiring learning.